The Mystery Cameron and the Mission of ThePutterPlace.com

So today I bring you the case of the mystery Cameron and a expand a little more on the mission of ThePutterPlace.com

 

Can you guess what is under this headcover?  One could logically assume that if I have taken the time to protect my putter with a custom Cameron headcover that there must be something special underneath.

Have you made your guess?  Scroll down when ready…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kudos to all of you who guessed Scotty Cameron Teryllium Two Newport Longneck!

 

I would honestly be amazed if you guessed this putter out of the legions of Cameron creations.  I bet some of you did guess Newport though…

How about that condition?  Would you expect to see rust like this on a site dedicated to beautiful putters?

 

What about this scarred top line?

 

Looks like the bottom may have hit some balls from the cart path.

 

That insert needs some help as well…

 

 

I am showcasing this putter today for one simple reason; I love this putter!  Although I have worked my way through a couple dozen Camerons over the past few years, this Tel3 is one that I would never consider moving out of the putter stable.  This gem was manufactured over a decade ago, and it shows its age nearly everywhere.  When I purchased the putter, I replaced the grip with a NOS Cameron Chord grip, and I strongly considered sending it to BOS, LaMont, or even the Cameron Custom Shop for a restoration.  Two things prevented me from sending it in though.  First the cost of Tel3 restoration at the Custom Shop is expensive.  Second, and more important, I realized that I like playing it in its “gamed” condition.  I think that this putter is like a well-oiled and broken in baseball glove.  The new glove may look awesome, but there is nothing like the comfort that comes with the well worn glove.

 

Should Scotty decided to release a new line of Tel3 putters, I would definitively consider buying one.  If there was a longneck, I would definitely grab one.  If the Newport Buttonbacks were not so expensive, I would definitely own and game one of those.  Even with those putters in my arsenal though, I know that this putter would be in the bag for a handful of rounds a year.  I just enjoy playing with it.

 

Perhaps the beauty of this putter is more intrinsic than extrinsic.  Maybe I am the only one that finds joy in its rust.  That is fine, and that is really the point of this post.  ThePutterPlace.com is all about you showing the world your beautiful putter.  You can explain to us why it is beautiful to you.  Maybe we’ll get it, maybe we won’t.  It doesn’t matter, you get it.

So send in those pictures.  This site is not about big money custom putters, it is about “beautiful” putters.  Don’t get me wrong, I hope some of you out there have some sweet expensive metal to share with us.  Lots of copper and damascus would be great.  But I also want to see your Zebras, the Ping you inherited when your father passed away, or even the TaylorMade Spider that was the first putter that you purchased when you took up golf.  There are a million different putters out there an a million great stories to go with them.  We can’t wait to read yours.

Send it in!  contact@theputterplace.com